Saturday, 6 November 2010

The Vatican

 On our second day, we decided we had enough funds to start paying for stuff, and visited the Vatican museum.

We wanted to see the Sistine Chapel. You could easily spend a whole day here at the museum. It cost 15 Euros each to get in, and another 7 Euros for an English audio guide (well worth the money as we would have missed so much)

This Ibis is from the Egyptian collection and just took my eye as an inspiring shape. May do something with this! Obviously the Egyptian part of the museum is large because of the Romano/Egyptian history. Lots of stuff was bought to Rome...statues were used as garden ornaments etc.  (For comparison, it's not quite as large a collection as at the British Museum, but has some wonderful mummies etc which children especially would enjoy)


The ceiling of the map room. It's actually a very long corridor which houses 13 huge maps of early Italy.....
...such as this one...
We beetled along at a fair old rate as we needed to be somewhere else by lunchtime.

Raphael's ceilings etc. They speak for themselves.





















Look, a garden with grass. It was the most beautiful garden and went on for acres. Lucky old Pope.


I found it slightly upsetting; galling. All this wealth, all this grandeur, all this fine living, and at night, in the square outside the Vatican, homeless people sleep in the doorways. They're moved off the steps, but they're there. 


2 comments:

  1. Oh, and I should say just for my own good, that the gent you see begging in the piccy is not homeless.....I couldn't bring myself to photograph the true homeless. This chap, and his partner - a woman who bends herself double and shuffles - are beggars, and we'd seen them the previous day leaving their house near the Vatican. They were having a blazing row shouting endlessly at each other. They are both very able bodied and had no visible disabilities...the stick is for show as is the lack of a left leg which was tucked up underneath him. He looked about 55-60ish.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Indeed, that glorious palace ... and the stark contrast outside...

    ReplyDelete