Saturday, 24 August 2013

Grrrr. Censored in World Quilt by Mancuso

Apparently you can now only view my quilt currently touring the States behind a black curtain.


http://thenewuu.com/2013/08/20/a-quilted-nude-self-portrait-a-uu-owl-program-for-women-65/

Nobody had the good manners to tell me of course. I have written to ask for it back.

16 comments:

  1. Unbelievable, I have never been able to understand the double standards in the States they have Sex and the City and Girls on TV but they hide artwork behind a curtain!!!!!!

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  2. Good grief. You can only pity people who won't try to see beyond their own prejudices - what a lot they miss in life. Thank you for your beautiful quilts - I've only seen one "in the flesh" but hope to see more in the future!

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  3. Aren't you angry? This is ridiculous. Hello it is 2013,but I must say, stunnung quilts.

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  4. I apologize for my fellow Americans, some of whom are very narrow minded and try to create controversy where there should be none. America in 2013 is definitely more backwards than it was 40 years ago.

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  5. appalling censorship and wowserism. I want to kick shins on your behalf but settled for tweeting a link to this post. Absolutely outrageous and insulting treatment!

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  6. Absolutely beautiful quilts. Thank you for making them and sharing them with us. Just for once quilts with something to say!!

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  7. Shame on them-------absolutely appalled!

    Do they wear blinkers in art galleries or passing statuary?

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  8. That's terrible! Your quilts are not at all gratuitous, and in fact I think show women's bodies of all sizes in a brilliant and positive light. I was so inspired by your work and was fascinated by how you'd portrayed the older ladies in the nude. Their bodies showed the lives that they'd lived - both through the words that you'd written but also just through the shapes and contours. They were beauty itself.

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  9. Well done for requesting its return A, and keep up the good work. You know where I stand, lie and sit on this one.

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  10. Absolutely ridiculous!! Nobody would bat an eyelid in an art exhibition. Love your quilts and the skill and thought that goes into them and it was great to finally meet you in person at FoQ and see more of the quilts in the flesh (pun intended!)
    PS Intrigued to know what was in the lost comment on my blog!

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  11. Annabel

    Unbelievable! But then I forget how old fashioned and prudish authorities in the USA can be! Love the quilts and do not understand that they could be classed as rude! Well done for asking for it back.

    love
    Clare

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  12. Annabel, I am so glad that you've asked for it back! I tried to comment on your last post, but sadly the comment disappeared into cyber space and I just couldn't formulate the same comment. But, this morning I read Laura Kemshall's post, and now I feel I owe it to you to try again.

    Your art is incredible, and as you say, nudes have been, and continue to be, seen in fine art with total acceptance. I can't imagine an art gallery warning people that there are nude images within! Your pieces are far beyond simply quilts and certainly fine art! This fiasco in the US is only holding back art quilts from being accepted as art.

    In the past few months I have been thrilled to have had three pieces accepted into juried art shows in galleries that historically featured only paintings and such...such a big step toward the acceptance of art quilts as fine art rather than a 'craft'. The people who found it necessary to hide your piece are knocking us back decades!

    And to the American quilter who asked you "Why nudes?", I wonder that she couldn't see past the nudity to truly see the art and the incredible message within! And to have gone further and expressed disapproval...really!

    This situation is truly so sad and frustrating. I can't even imagine how hurt and outraged you must be by all of this.

    Hugs,
    Linda

    P.S. I must tell you that I am in awe of your talent to create such incredibly life like women with this medium!

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  13. This censorship makes me think of The Subversive Stitch by Rosika Parker, who wrote about how women have always used stitch and embroidery to express views that were otherwise repressed. This book was written in 1967 and really there is nothing that has taken it further since. Issues in this situation that are interesting, are that one complaint has led to censorship (what power base does this person have); the maker has not been informed, or presumably been given a copy of the complaint (what is the strength of the argument?). If there is a textile student who is interested in feminism, this would make a fantastic subject for an essay or dissertation.

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  14. OMG - read about this on Laura's blog and can't believe this! Your work is A-MAZ-ING - hope I get to see it in person one day.

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  15. Hi. This is to bad. I went to Birmingham with one big goal..to see your quilts. And I loved them, your ladies looks just as I do...a little to big and a bit used.. To bad they won't show how Real wommen looks "overthere" !
    Keep up your great work! I realy hope your quilts could be shown here in Norway one beautifull day.

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  16. It's a beautiful quilt!

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